Fort Casey State Park

Fort Casey State Park is a 467-acre marine camping park with a lighthouse and sweeping views of Admiralty Inlet and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The park is the site of Admiralty Head Lighthouse. A coast artillery post features two 10-inch and two 3-inch historic guns on display. The park features 10,810-feet of saltwater shoreline on Puget Sound (Admiralty Inlet), and includes Keystone Spit, a two-mile stretch of land separating Admiralty Inlet and Crocket Lake.
  1. Activities
  2. Boating
  3. Camping
  4. History
  5. Maps

Picnic & Day-Use Facilities
The park offers 68 unsheltered picnic tables. Picnic sites are first come, first served.

Activities
Trails
  • 1.8 miles of hiking trails
Water Activities & Features
  • Boating
  • Diving
  • Saltwater fishing
  • Two boat ramps
Other Activities & Features
  • Amphitheater
  • Beach exploration
  • Bird watching
  • Two fire circles
Interpretive Opportunities
Interpretive panels in Admiralty Head Lighthouse tell the history of the area around Fort Casey State Park. The story begins with a brief cultural history about the Native American nations from the area, and then leads the reader forwarded through time to the first pioneer settlers, the building of the Red Bluff Lighthouse and the construction of Fort Casey.

From May 23 through September 1, volunteers with the Fort Casey Volunteer Battalion lead guided tours of the gun batteries at Fort Casey State Park. The 45-minute tours are scheduled as follows:
  • Friday at 1 p.m.
  • Saturday, Sunday, and National holidays at 1 and 2:30 p.m.
Meet at the kiosk between Battery Worth and the parking lot. For more information, call 360-678-4519.

Additional Information
  • The park contains a designated remote-control glider area and a parade field popular for kite-flying.
  • The lighthouse is open seasonally. Tours can be arranged by calling 360-240-5584.
  • A recreational license is required for fishing and shellfish harvesting at Washington state parks. For regulations, fishing season information, or to purchase a recreational license, visit the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.