Illahee State Park

Illahee State Park is a 75-acre marine camping park with 1,785-feet of saltwater frontage on Port Orchard Bay. Illahee means earth or country in the Indian tradition, and views of Puget Sound from the Illahee beach give the viewer a sense of what that word meant to native people. The park has plenty of parking space, lots of fresh air, facilities for a number of outdoor activities, and access to a variety of watersports. The park features a veterans' war memorial and the last stand of old-growth timber in Kitsap County. One of the largest yew trees in the nation grows in this park.
  1. Activities
  2. Boating
  3. Camping
  4. History
  5. Maps

Picnic & Day-Use Facilities
The park provides four reservable picnic shelters with electricity, plus 90 additional unsheltered picnic sites. To reserve kitchen shelters, call the park at 360-478-6460. Picnic sites are available first come, first served. Day-use groups of 20 or more are required to register and pay the applicable fees.

Activities
Trails
  • 0.5 miles of hiking trails
Water Activities & Features
  • 356-feet of moorage
  • 360-feet of dock
  • Boating
  • Clamming
  • Crabbing
  • Diving
  • One boat ramp
  • Oysters
  • Personal watercraft
  • Saltwater fishing
  • Swimming
  • Water skiing
Other Activities & Features
  • Beach exploration
  • Bird watching
  • Softball field
  • Three horseshoe pits
  • Two volleyball fields
  • Wildlife viewing
Interpretive Opportunities
A veterans' war memorial is located in the park. Several interpretive displays are available that explain park features such as stilted trees, a Works Progress Administration-built kitchen shelter, totem garden, yew tree, and the pier.

Additional Information

  • The park provides a children's play area.
  • Other activities available include geocaching and metal detecting.
  • A recreational license is required for fishing and shellfish harvesting at Washington state parks. For regulations, fishing season information, or to purchase a recreational license, visit the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.